ZThemes
lotsofbirds:

Pheasant Coucal (Centropus phasianinus)
Distribution: Australia, Indonesia & Papua New Guinea
IUCN Status: Least Concern
{ Ecology } { Vocalizations } { eBird }
(Photo by Tom Tarrant // CC 2.0)

lotsofbirds:

Pheasant Coucal (Centropus phasianinus)

Distribution: Australia, Indonesia & Papua New Guinea

IUCN Status: Least Concern

Ecology } { Vocalizations } { eBird }

(Photo by Tom Tarrant // CC 2.0)

cool-critters:

Green vine snake (Ahaetulla nasuta)

The green vine snake is a slender green tree snake found in India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. It is diurnal and mildly venomous. The reptile normally feeds on frogs and lizards using its binocular vision to hunt. They are slow moving, relying on camouflaging as a vine in foliage. The snake expands its body when disturbed to show a black and white scale marking. Also, they may open their mouth in threat display and point their head in the direction of the perceived threat.

photo credits: rivughorai, wiki, Suhaas Premkumar for National Geographic

anguiculus:

charlemagne and a magpile

evocativesynthesis:

Scythian Griffin holding a stag head in its beak. From Pazyryk, Russian Altai mountains, 4th century B.C. Saint Petersburg, State Hermitage Museum. (via petrus.agricola)

evocativesynthesis:

Scythian Griffin holding a stag head in its beak. From Pazyryk, Russian Altai mountains, 4th century B.C. Saint Petersburg, State Hermitage Museum. (via petrus.agricola)

charlemagne and a magpile

cool-critters:

White-necked rockfowl (Picathartes gymnocephalus)

The white-necked rockfowl is a passerine mainly found in rocky forested areas at higher altitudes in West Africa from Guinea to Ghana. Its distribution is patchy, with populations often being isolated from each other. The rockfowl typically chooses to live near streams and inselbergs. These rockfowl feed primarily on insects, though parents feed small frogs to their young. One feeding strategy involves following army ant swarms, feeding on insects flushed by the ants. Rockfowl move through the forest primarily through a series of hops and bounds or short flights in low vegetation. This species rarely flies for long distances. The white-necked rockfowl is monogamous. This species is classified as Vulnerable as its dwindling and fragmented populations are threatened by habitat destruction.

photo credits: wiki, afrotropicalbirds, The Field Museum, Division of Birds, Ben Marks and Jason Weckstein

cool-critters:

Edible dormouse (Glis glis)

The edible dormouse is found throughout much of western Europe. It is the largest of all dormice, being around 14-19 cm in head-body length, plus a 11-13 cm tail. The edible dormouse is capable of limited autotomy: if another animal grasps the tail, the skin breaks easily and slides off the underlying bone, allowing the dormouse to escape. They prefer dense forests with rocky cliffs and caves, but may be found in maquis vegetation, orchards, and urban margins. Edible dormice are primarily herbivorous, feeding mainly on berries, apples, and nuts. Edible dormice are nocturnal, spending the day in nests taken from birds, or located in hollow trees or similar shelter. They are good climbers, and spend most of their time in the trees, although they are relatively poor jumpers.

photo credits: wiki, blog

anguiculus:

tweeter scribbledump :V

valsenthe (the ferryman, both alive!merfishy and dead!ragamuffin forms), vesana (hyena headdress lady), BILL FROM GRAVITY FALLS BECAUSE I LOST IT WHEN HE SHOWED UP IN THE LATEST EPISODE, vassily (commieshotabunnykid), and some axolotl hybridymonsterythings

s-c-i-guy:

600 Million Years and Counting…

I was pretty bored so I decided to make some GIFs of the last 600 million years of our planet’s plate tectonics.

The first GIF is a global mollewide projection. The second one is of the Colorado Plateau and the North American Southwest. The next GIF is of the entire formation of the North American Continent. The fourth GIF is of geologic and tectonic evolution of Europe. And finally the last one is the same as the first except in rectangular format.

I obtained the images from Global Paleogeography and them compiled them one by one into Photoshop with the end result being the above GIFs.

Geology rocks