ZThemes
fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Dream flying by df h) *European Kingfisher

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Dream flying by df h)
*European Kingfisher

astronomy-to-zoology:

White-breasted Waterhen

 (Amaurornis phoenicurus)

is a bird of the family Rallidae (rails). they can be found throughout most of Southeast Asia and parts of India. they are large in terms of rails at 32cm long. like most rails they can be found in marshes and wet areas but are also seen in plains and higher hills. they have a diet of mostly fish small invertebrates and sees like most aquatic birds. an individual can be identified by their white and black body with red tail feathers and yellow bill and legs. chicks like in all rails are pure black. they are also fairly vocal animals which is unusual among rails.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Gruiformes-Rallidae-Amauronis

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Psychedelic Jones Moth" (Thaumatographa jonesi)

…a strikingly colored species of Tortricid mot which occurs in eastern North America. Like other members of the subfamily Chlidanotinae T. jonesi is a day-flying moth and has been associated with pine forests. Thaumatographa jonesi is quite rare and as such much of its biology and ecology is not well known and host plant records are not well known. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Tortricoidea-Torticidae-Chlidanotinae-Thaumatographa-T. jonesi

Image(s): John R. Maxwell

libutron:

The Saiga (Saiga tatarica): on the verge of extinction

Commonly known as Saiga, Mongolian Saiga, and Saiga Antelope, Saiga tatarica (Bovidae) is a very distinctive looking antelope, with a large, proboscis-like nose which hangs down over its mouth.

The Saiga’s nose has a unique internal structure: the bones are greatly developed and convoluted, and the long nostrils contain numerous hairs, glands and mucous tracts. The trunk-like nose of the Saiga is a striking example of an exaggerated trait, assumed to having evolved as a dust filter for inhaled air. In addition, it functions to elongate the vocal tract in harem saiga males for producing low-formant calls that serve as a cue to body size for conspecifics.

Two subspecies are recognized: Saiga tatarica tatarica, and Saiga tatarica mongolica. The nominate subspecies is found in one location in Russia, while the Mongolian subspecies is found only in western Mongolia.

Renowned for its high reproductive potential, the species was thought to be able to withstand even relatively high levels of hunting for its horns - less than 20 years ago, the total saiga population stood at more than one million, and appeared relatively stable. However, intensified poaching pressures during the 1990s, coupled with a breakdown of law enforcement following the collapse of the Soviet Union, caused numbers to plummet to fewer than 50,000 in just one decade – one of the most sudden and dramatic population crashes of a large mammal ever seen.

Currently the Saiga is classified as Critically Endangered species on the IUCN Red List. 

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Igor Shpilenok | Locality: unknown] - [Bottom: ©Xavier Bayod Farre | Locality: captive at Kölner Zoo, Humboldtkolonie, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, 2007]

cool-critters:

Candy crab (Hoplophrys oatesi)

The candy crab is a very colourful crab that grows from 1.5 to 2 cm. It lives on various species of soft coral in the Dendronephthya genus. It camouflages itself by mimicing the colours of the polyps among which it hides. It adds further camouflage by attaching polyps to its carapace. Colours vary depending on the colour of the coral, and may be white, pink, yellow or red. This crab is widespread in the Indo-Pacific and it feeds on plankton. photo credits: digimuse, Brian Maye, divemecressi

rhamphotheca:

"The Black and Rufous Elephant Shrew (Rhynchocyon petersi)… one of 16 species of elephant shrew alive today in Africa…”

rhamphotheca:

"The Black and Rufous Elephant Shrew (Rhynchocyon petersi)… one of 16 species of elephant shrew alive today in Africa…”

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Fight by nitin jain) *European/ Common Kingfishers

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Fight by nitin jain)
*European/ Common Kingfishers

avianeurope:

Spanish Imperial Eagle (Aquila adalberti) »by José Luis

avianeurope:

Spanish Imperial Eagle (Aquila adalberti) »by José Luis

cool-critters:

Tamandua

Tamandua is a genus of anteaters with two species: the southern tamandua and the northern tamandua. The northern tamandua ranges from southeastern Mexico south throughout Central America, and in South America west of the Andes from northern Venezuela to northern Peru. Southern tamanduas are found from Venezuela and Trinidad to northern Argentina, southern Brazil and Uruguay. They live in forests and grasslands, are semiarboreal, and possess partially prehensile tails. They mainly eat ants and termites, but they occasionally eat bees, beetles, and insect larvae. They have no teeth and depend on their powerful gizzards to break down their food. The tamanduas are nocturnal, active at night and secreting away in hollow tree trunks and burrows abandoned by other animals during daylight hours. They spend up to half of their time in the treetops, as much as 64%, where they forage for arboreal ants and termites. Tamanduas move rather awkwardly on the ground. They walk on the sides on their clenched forefeet to avoid injuring their palms with their sharp claws. The tamandua’s small eyes afford limited vision. Instead of relying on their sense of sight, they primarily utilize their senses of smell and hearing to locate their insect prey.

photo credits: chbecker, ferrebeekeeper, Quartl, wiki